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The Feud in The Bedroom

   by Christopher Edinjiklian and Teddy Edinjiklian (Father) and music by Kevin Macleod for Re-Invent a Work of Art (2013)

OK, here it is step by step!

My father and I began first by stripping apart the mystery kit box itself with an xacto knife, using it to create the walls and floors of the bedroom. There was lots of trimming and scaling involved to create a likeliness to Van Goghs bedroom. After much observation of the painting, it was evident Van Goghs ceiling was angled, and we could pretty accurately create what was cropped out of The Bedroom painting. We then stripped the cardboard of its paper, and used that along with the glue to adhere the attached pieces of cardboard to create sturdy walls. Essentially, we made makeshift tape. We then wanted to replicate the texture of the walls in the painting, so we used the shredded newsprint to painstakingly glue each strip to the wall, overlapping each piece then securing it in place with glue. We then painted the walls and floor with acrylic paint. Next was the window. This was cut out of the scraps of cardboard. The exposed cardboard edges were neatly covered with the paper stripped from other cardboard scraps, and the "glass" was created with that as well, and painted over with acrylic then glued onto the back of the windows. Then the windows were glued onto the wall. After that, we cut out the door on the right. It's made of cardboard, and the cardboards paper was glued on to make it appear more like the panels on a door. Then the door was painted over with acrylic. Attaching the door to the wall was a little tricky. We used a thin strip of the oak plywood that was glued to where the hinge on a door would be. Then on the back side, we glued a long strip of cardboard paper to the plywood, and attached the door with glue to the paper, so it would open and close. This sounds more difficult than described, as the weight of the door would pull away from where we had glued it to the paper strip. For the time it took the glue to dry, we kept a piece of removable tape to secure it in place, then peeled it off, leaving no residue behind. Then we painted the door straight onto the right wall with acrylic. We used removable tape to create a clean edge on the wall then removed it, again leaving no residue behind. It was time to create the paintings that were hung on the bedroom walls. Those were created with cardboard scraps cut to shape and scaled appropriately. Some of the paintings were made of cardboard and some were just of the cardboard paper. The frames as well were glued on with cardboard paper, and the edges lined with thin strips of cardboard paper. They were all painted with acrylic. The 4 paintings on the right wall were glued in place, where as the two on the back wall are actually hanging in place. This was done by taking the thread from the canvas cloth, painting it black, and gluing it to the backs of the paintings. Once that dried, we created "hooks" with thin pieces of cardboard and glued them to the wall, painting them with gray acrylic. The paintings hung better than expected. After that, we created the cloth and clothes hanging on the walls. The three items of clothes on the back wall are created from the cardboard paper, crumpled up to resemble drapery, then painted with acrylic. The "clothing rack" was just a thin piece of the hardwood, sanded smooth then glued to the wall, along with three small pieces of wood to make the hooks where the drapery could be hung and glued in place. In the original painting of The Bedroom, there appears to be a broom on the corner near the clothing rack, so we created a broom with a thin strip of the oak plywood that we sanded round, and glued strips of the shredded newsprint to look like broom bristles.The drapery on the left wall is also made of the cardboard paper crumpled up and painted, except we used a small piece of the steel wire as a hook that we poked into the wall to hang the item and glue in place. It was time to finally fold the bedroom together. Again, this was more difficult than we anticipated. Due to the heavy amounts of glue and paper, the cardboard walls and floors warped, so we had to secure the folds with clamps as the glue dried to hold the walls in place. We also created an extending piece of floor to where we could attach the door to on the left wall where Paul Gauguin would be standing. It's a scrap piece of the cardboard box, with shredded newsprint glued to it and painted over in acrylic. It's attached on the bottom with cardboard paper and glue. Now we could start creating all of the objects in the bedroom. First was the bed. We used a table saw to cut the large piece of flat hardwood to size, then shaped the fine details with a 3 inch multi purpose bench grinder. We also glued thin pieces of oak plywood to the headboard. The entire bed was glued together using the gluestick for a sturdy hold. Then the mattress was created using the canvas cloth stuffed with the shredded newsprint and glued over. We painted the canvas with acrylic. The pillows are shaped out of the floral foam and painted over with acrylic. The red "sheet" on the bed is simply the canvas cloth painted with red acrylic. The small table was next in line. This was created with the blocks of hardwood, each of the legs were cut to size with the bench grinder and the drawer and table top was made with the oak plywood. However, once we created the table, it looked too short and too wide, so we adjusted the height and width. In the original painting of The Bedroom, there are glass jars, cups, and other items that sit on top of the small table. We sculpted those out of the Chavant clay and painted them with acrylic and placed them beneath the table. Next were the chairs. We didn't have enough of the wooden dowels to create all the legs, so we used the scraps from large piece of flat hardwood and sanded them down to round them out. The back of the chairs were shaped with the oak plywood. All of the pieces were glued together. We created the seats for the chairs with the floral foam and textured it with an xacto knife then painted it over with acrylic and glued in place. Next was the vase of sunflowers. The vase is made of the blocks of hardwood, and sanded to shape with the bench grinder and painted in acrylic. We drilled holes into the top to place in the sunflowers. The sunflowers are made of steel wire, cardboard, floral foam, and cardboard paper. The wires are painted green, with a small cardboard circle glued to the tops so the floral form circle could be glued to it as well as the cardboard paper petals. Everything is then painted over with acrylic and the sunflowers are glued into the vase. The painting of the sunflowers was next. Same as the paintings on the walls, the painting is made of cardboard and the edges lined with cardboard paper and painted with acrylic to look like an unfinished painting. The easel was next, it's simply cut out of the hardwood and glued together. It was finally time to begin sculpting Mr. Van Gogh. We began with a simple wire armature, and to conserve our Chavant clay, we decided to cut out pants and a shirt out of the canvas cloth, then sewed it together with the canvas thread. Then we stuffed the garments with the shredded newsprint. This created a good amount of bulk for our figure, we covered and sculpted the rest with the chavant clay. The head of Van Gogh was sculpted separately, to be attached on later. The body was painted with acrylic. We had more chavant clay left over than expected, so we were able to sculpt Gauguin using a wire armature and the clay. He was also painted with acrylic. It was time to bash Van Goghs head with his own painting. We cut into the sunflower painting with an xacto knife, folding the pieces upward, putting it through his neck and attaching his head on top. Lastly, we created the box with the paint tubes in it with oak plywood glued together. The paint tubes are sculpted with the chavant clay and painted with acrylic in different colors. The paint brushes are also made with chavant clay and painted with acrylic. Van Goghs palette is made with cardboard scrap, painted with acrylic, and the edges lined with cardboard paper. As a last touch, we created Van Goghs hat using cardboard paper, glue and acrylic paint.

We felt it wouldn't do the contest justice to merely to recreate Van Goghs painting, we wanted to go a few steps beyond and create a three dimensional story of what happened in that bedroom, particularly between roommates Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Gauguin. Our idea first started off as a "painting within a painting" of just Van Gogh painting his sunflowers in his bedroom. It was somewhat boring, so we wanted to add a humorous twist. It is said that Gauguin's and Van Gogh's feud was fueled by a fight to win over a prostitute by the name of Rachel. It's also said that the combination of cabin fever and Gauguin's and Van Gogh's opposing views of art (Gauguin, who painted from his memory and Van Gogh, who painted what he saw) were contributing factors of their constant bickering and even so it's widely debated that it was in fact Gauguin who cut off Van Gogh's ear. We wanted to find a mid point and stuck with the idea of artists being artists stricken with cabin fever.

Our Plot: Paul Gauguin storms into Vincent Van Goghs bedroom, smashes his painting of his sunflowers over poor Vincent's head while he's sitting in shock wondering what's the matter with Paul as he calls him a crazy, boring idiot for painting what he sees.

We felt it wouldn't do the contest justice to merely to recreate Van Goghs painting, we wanted to go a few steps beyond and create a three dimensional story of what happened in that bedroom, particularly between roommates Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Gauguin. Our idea first started off as a "painting within a painting" of just Van Gogh painting his sunflowers in his bedroom. It was somewhat boring, so we wanted to add a humorous twist. It is said that Gauguin's and Van Gogh's feud was fueled by a fight to win over a prostitute by the name of Rachel. It's also said that the combination of cabin fever and Gauguin's and Van Gogh's opposing views of art (Gauguin, who painted from his memory and Van Gogh, who painted what he saw) were contributing factors of their constant bickering and even so it's widely debated that it was in fact Gauguin who cut off Van Gogh's ear. We wanted to find a mid point and stuck with the idea of artists being artists stricken with cabin fever.

Our Plot: Paul Gauguin storms into Vincent Van Goghs bedroom, smashes his painting of his sunflowers over poor Vincent's head while he's sitting in shock wondering what's the matter with Paul as he calls him a crazy, boring idiot for painting what he sees.

 


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